Posts tagged with ‘Aircooled’


In 1956, Renault introduced the world to the Dauphine, a rear-engined economy car that succeeded the pint-sized successful post-war 4CV. With its remarkably small size, beautiful aesthetics, and fantastic practicality, it was an immediate success, having sold more than two million units by the time production ended 11 years later. Despite building so many, however, chances are that you’ve never even seen one until now. At least, what remains of it.

-CLICK HERE TO READ MORE-


Chuck Beck’s name has long been synonymous with the best Porsche replicas on planet Earth. While authentic 356 coupes, speedsters, and 904s are well out-of-reach for the common man, Beck’s namesake has been attached to some of the best recreations money can buy, and for going on nearly 40 years.

-CLICK HERE TO READ MORE-

Since its introduction in 1938 until 2003 when the last one rolled off the assembly line, Volkwagen has built more than 21,500,000 aircooled Beetles. Yes, that’s a lot. Surprisingly, though, it’s part of what makes Luigi di Gioia’s ’64 Beetle all the more impressive… It’s astoundingly rare to find classic, unrestored examples in such condition, let alone modified extensively. Luigi’s Beetle still wears its original paint which gives way to perfection throughout the car.

-CLICK HERE TO READ MORE-

Photography by Mike Crawat
Bart Kuyken isn’t what one might consider your run-of-the-mill StanceWorks feature owner. Amidst the auto shop owners, weekend warriors, and a slew of do-it-yourselfers, Bart lives a life between two cities: Antwerp, Belgium and Paris, France. “Having a life in both cities is a blessing,” he says. “I meet so many different people this way.

-CLICK HERE TO READ MORE-

It’s hard to steal the show at Worthersee, to say the least. When it comes to Volkswagens, it’s hard to conjure an idea that hasn’t been beaten to death as seemingly every considerable mod has been applied to seemingly every chassis. What’s left falls into the realm of creativity, and more often than not, it seems better to stick with the tried and true than to venture into the unknown. For Thomas Mayr and Martin Mildenberger, however, the formula was not so simple.

-CLICK HERE TO READ MORE-
Social links powered by Ecreative Internet Marketing