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Thread: DIY Wheel Refinishing - BBS Style 5s

  1. #1
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    Post DIY Wheel Refinishing - BBS Style 5s

    The specs for style 5s are pretty generic but for those that don't know the wheels are:

    17x8 et20 From an E39 528i with sport package.

    I plan on running 205/40/17 Falken ZE-912 UHPAS.

    *As well it should be noted that to properly mate these wheels to an E36 they need hubcentric rings. The hub bore on the E39 is 74.1 and the E36 is 72.5 - just slightly smaller. The hubcentric ring just makes up for that small gap.


    BBS RC090




    I started yesterday with a trip to the hardware store to get all the necessities. I bought:

    A 10mm 12 point socket - to remove the bolts ($3)

    A 10 inch extension - to be able to reach all the way in to the wheel ($10)

    A "Nail set" *the grey one* - this is to tap out all the bolts after removing the nuts. They come in different colors, each represents a different size. The grey one is a good size. ($5)

    Jasco - Paint and epoxy remover ($10)

    Sand paper - 150, 220, 400, 600, 1500 grit (>$2 each)

    You will also need some sort of extension for the socket, it made taking the bolts off a piece of cake. I used a random piece of pipe that fit over the end of my socket handle. You can see it in my third and fifth picture.
    AND

    A dead blow hammer

    OR a piece of wood, I used a 4x4 block that was laying around in the yard :dunno This is for pounding on the center after taking out the bolts. Just be sure to wrap it in a towel so you don't damage your wheel.




    Today I started the disassembly process:

    Close up of the worst areas:







    I flipped all the wheels over and sprayed them all with PB Blaster, to loosen the bolts up a little before trying to take them apart.





    Then I used the pipe extension around my socket wrench to go to town on the bolts. I separated the nuts and bolts into two different jars each full of vinegar.





    This is the wheel with all the nuts off.



    Now that you have all the nuts off, you have to use the "nail set" to tap the bolts out. Now this may seem easier than it really is. You have to smack the bolts pretty damn hard, some come out on the first hit some take 3 or 4 hits. You will figure out your own technique on how you want to hold the nail set and at which angle you find more comfortable. I say that because I hit my thumb a few times and scratched the wheel a few times This is the hardest part of taking them apart. It is very tedious work, so remember that the slower you go the less likely you will scratch, gouge or hit your wheel.

    It was a pain in the ass doing the first wheel but by the time I was doing the 4th I totally had the hang of it. It gets easier as you go.



    Now that you have the bolts out, flip the wheel over, get your wood block wrapped in a towel or your dead blow hammer. Place it on the center of the wheel - hit it. Now move the block to one edge (3 o'clock postion) - hit it, rotate the wheel - hit it, rotate the wheel - hit it so on and so forth.... They'll come out eventually, and like those damn bolts some come out easier than others. It took 4 or 5 hits before they came out.






    After doing this same process to each of the 4 wheels, I sprayed them all with some degreaser and gave them a light scrub down. They were so dirty from years of road grime and PB Blaster.

    This is what I was left with.



    The bolts and nuts are still soaking in their jars of vinegar.

    DAY #2
    UPDATE:


    What you will need:
    Some things I list I'm just going to go ahead and assume you will have lying around.

    Jasco
    Paint brush
    Metal container
    Old rags
    Any open area

    I started by taking the barrels out to a very well ventilated area where I could apply the Jasco. This is to remove the clear coat from the barrels.
    Note: the nuts and bolts in vinegar.



    This stuff is nasty.
    Do not breathe it and DO NOT GET IT ON YOUR SKIN. Wear long sleeves and thick gloves. I accidentally let my wrist brush against one of the wheels after the Jasco was applied and even though it was dry it started burning me instantly. Just be safe, use your head.


    Pour the Jasco in to a shallow metal container. I used a plastic container lined with aluminum foil, which worked just fine. Then with your paint brush, brush the Jasco on to your lips. I found that the more you use the more clear coat it eats away and the easier it is to get off.


    This was my first coat, which was pretty light - but go ahead and glob it on. The more the merrier.



    After applying it to all 4 wheels let it dry for 20 to 30 minutes. It works pretty fast. I could hear one of the wheels making a hissing noise within seconds after applying the Jasco.


    I drained out my vinegar jars and took a look at the nuts and bolts.
    The vinegar did a good job cleaning them up. It loosened all the grime and blue loctite was gone.



    While waiting for the Jasco to dry I wiped each bolt... Yes, individually. And put them separately in other clean jars.



    30 minutes later, the lips should be dry and are ready to be wiped down.
    Get your gloves and your old rag, and start wiping the lip. I found that one of three possible outcomes will occur.

    1.It is easy to wipe off and your left with nice smooth bare metal.
    or
    2. It doesn't come off at all.
    or
    3. Where it sort of comes off but leaves behind a residue.

    This is the first coat...


    Second or third coat and a lot of wiping later...


    Still a lot of residue, but getting there...


    So depending on how much you can get off with the first round of Jasco, just keep doing what we did before. Apply - Wait - Rub off, Apply - Wait - Rub off... Until its all gone. It took me 4 maybe 5 different coats before I got it all off.
    *Remember, as in accordance with the rest of this project, it takes a while.


    Since it might take a while... What do you do with all that in between time?

    Clean up your centers!
    I've found that the Mr.Clean magic eraser is a wonderful tool to use. They are $2.50 for a 2 pack and happen to work great for stuff like this.

    Note: The bottom left one is clean


    This

    To This



    Back out side the lips are almost there, about 95% clear coat free. It takes a lot of scrubbing to get it all off.




    Here is one of the lips all done. I haven't even started sanding yet and it looks way better with out the clear coat.

    Last edited by BeemerBuyer; 12-04-2009 at 02:41 PM.
    -Nick

  2. #2
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    SANDING!
    You will need:

    150, 220, 400, 600, 1500, and 2000 grit sand paper

    A few hand towels

    Gloves


    After you have removed all of the clear coat you can prep an area for sanding. I chose a work bench, because I did not want to sit bent over the wheels the whole time I was sanding.

    DISCLAIMER: I am not polishing the lips at all. I am doing something a little bit different than most people do with their style 5s. I am prepping them for paint.



    Here is one wheel ready to be sanded.



    Here is a close up of one of the nasty areas. :banghead: Seriously corroded...


    Start with 150 grit sand paper.

    fold the sand paper in half and then wrapped it around a shop towel. It makes for a soft core that will mold to the shape of the wheel and is easier to hang on to.




    Note: I did use 100 grit in the corroded areas only. They really needed it to get down through to smooth metal again. Though I am going to leave it to you to choose if your wheels are in need of a thorough spot sanding like mine did.

    Here is what the wheel will look like after 150 grit. Already nice and smooth.



    When sanding never go in circles, go back an forth around the lip. The back and forth motion makes a lot of sense, especially when your standing in front of your wheel getting ready to start. Its easier and it won't ruin the look your going for.

    I found it effective to do half of the wheel at a time - half of the top edge - rotate - repeat
    Then half of the lip it self - rotate - repeat
    Then half of the bottom where the bolts attach -rotate - repeat.

    Then going over the entire wheel in one continuous stroke.


    Here is after round 2 - 220 grit



    Ohhh so smooth and ready for paint.




    After I finished the lips I started cleaning the centers again. I washed them by hand in the sink. I used the Mr.Clean magic eraser again. Just as a final cleaning.
    Sorry I didn't take any pics of this... but its pretty straight forward.
    Last edited by BeemerBuyer; 12-04-2009 at 02:41 PM.
    -Nick

  3. #3
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    Prepping for Paint.

    You will need:

    Gloves

    Paint / Primer / Clear Coat $45

    (For lack of a better name ) Scruff pad - Ultra Fine $1

    Paper Towels

    News Paper

    Blue Painters Tape $3



    Last week I sanded the lips, today I prepped for paint.


    I started today by washing the lips really well with degreaser. This is important to do after sanding because there will be lots of metal shavings and dust left on the surface.

    Obviously you don't want anything on the surface of the wheels if your planing on painting them.



    Wash and dry them completely.

    First I used a cotton towel. Then I used a paper towel to really get the moisture off.




    Lay out your news paper in a well ventilated area and situate your wheels so they are evenly spaced apart on top of the news paper.




    If you are polishing the lips, this does not pertain to you.

    Here I have all my paint/primer/clear coat.

    I bought my paint supplies at a local automotive paint store.

    I bought:
    2 cans of primer
    3 cans of paint
    2 cans of clear coat




    Start with the primer. Many thin layers are key. TAKE YOUR TIME!
    Primer applied.



    While the lips are drying. Move on to the centers.

    I bought an ultra fine sanding scrub pad to "rough" up the centers to give the primer something extra to stick to. The scrubbing pad left some little bits behind. So I used a moist paper towel to go over each wheel again and get everything off.



    Before


    I covered the edge of the centers with painters tape. In hind sight I don't know if it was necessary... but I thought it would better to be safe than sorry. :dunno

    With a few layers of primer.





    Paint will be next.
    Last edited by BeemerBuyer; 12-04-2009 at 02:36 PM.
    -Nick

  4. #4
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    Paint. Paint. Paint.


    Last week I stopped after priming the centers and the barrels. Yesterday I began painting.

    What you will need:

    Well ventilated area

    Painters tape

    News paper

    Paint

    Lots of time - Do Not - DO NOT - Do not rush the painting process.



    So after priming the centers and the barrels I realized that I forgot to do the center caps! So those were first on my list.

    I scrubbed them with the same ultra fine pad I used on my centers. It roughed up the surface just a little bit for the first layer of primer to stick to.

    Here they are after scrubbing.



    After a few light layers of primer I let them sit.



    Meanwhile, I began actually painting the barrels. Again, you want to do many, slowly applied, light layers of paint. Wait even just few minutes between coats, then hit them again. Im not going to post any exact number of coats that are necessary because I don't know. Everyone will have their own idea of how much is needed.

    I used a lot of paint, others may use more, others may use less... You be the judge. Hold the can about 10 - 12 inches from the surface. Be consistent through out the painting process. Although it is better to be too far than too close.

    Here are the barrels after a few coats of gloss white.




    Here are the barrels after another few layers... Now waiting for clear coat.




    After your barrels have had some time to dry its time to move on to your centers.


    I know I sound like a broken record, but just bare with me... :help This is for your own good.
    TAKE YOUR TIME!

    Sorry for yelling.
    Its just that the centers aren't exactly easy to paint. I chose to lay a few "top" coats before I did anything else - This being just misting the top a few times.

    Then I sprayed each spoke individually first from the outer edge inward toward the spokes. This is to get the portion where the spoke meets the center. I repeated this technique for the smaller spokes that form closer to the outer edge as well.

    After that I did the reverse of what I just mentioned. I sprayed each spoke individually going from the center of the wheel toward the outer edge.


    Now that you have the painted the areas where the spoke meets both the inner and outer edge of the wheel, its time to spray the "sides" of the spokes.
    I usually chose the right side of the spokes first. Spraying in a side to side motion I painted each right side of every spoke. Then using the same technique I did each left side of every spoke.


    By the time you have done each wheel, the wheel it self should look very painted. BUT it might be missing in some spots, use a bright light to check up close.



    Close up



    Now, since I have had lots of time painting and waiting. I have been spraying the center caps in the in between time.
    The center caps are far easier to paint just remember to keep a consistence distance and use light layers, otherwise -
    Just point and shoot.








































































    And when you put them all together you get something like this -

    -Nick

  5. #5
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    Clear Coat!



    I finally got some clear coat on the wheels. They look amazing, so glossy and they are nice and smooth.

    I prepped by laying out my news paper and getting the lips,centers and caps all laid out on top of the news paper. The clear coat application wasn't very hard, nothing out of the ordinary. If your following this while doing your own set of wheels, you'll have the hang of it for sure.

    I used the same techniques that I have been using all along the way. Refer to the painting update if your having troubles. Remember to do lots of light coats.



    Area prepped and ready to start spraying.



    Its hard to tell, but this is after 2 or 3 coats.





    In total I did close to 6 or 7 coats... HAHA, maybe more I don't remember. After everything was dry I started on my center caps! Woot.

    I didn't take a picture of the back of the BBS cap it self :banghead: I'll explain the best I can.
    If you haven't already bought them you will be looking for the 70mm caps. I got mine from Puremotorsport. The 70mm caps have 3 prongs/clips that stick out.

    I took pliers and gently started to bend these prongs back and forth until they broke off. I repeated this for each of the 4 caps.



    Then, after all the tabs are broken off, the back of the cap is semi flat. There is also a small lip that sticks out in addition to the 3 prongs that I broke off, but they aren't really a problem and they will mount just fine leaving them intact.

    Using a hot glue gun I glued them in to the style 5 cap.





    Caps done.


    Now that those are done you can go back outside to start the reassembly process.

    I didn't get very much done yesterday so Im going to get off the internet and go to work right now.
    Last edited by BeemerBuyer; 12-04-2009 at 02:38 PM.
    -Nick

  6. #6
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    Re-assembly.


    What you will need -

    Blue Threadlocker $5.50

    Torque wrench I own mine... You should too. ~$50 :dunno

    Steel wool

    WD-40

    10 in extention

    10 point head



    I was struggling so hard this morning trying to figure out how the hell I was going to get these back together. :help

    Paint had gotten in to all the bolt holes, making it really hard to get the bolts through. So I used a round file to grind out all of the excess paint that was in the holes.
    My bolts had become kind of rusty since they had been washed and then sat for a few weeks in a jar. :az I used steel wool to clean them off. Then hit them with some WD-40 to help them slide back into the lip.






    Push the bolts hard enough into the lip so they aren't falling out on their own. Then after putting the bolts through the holes, put the centers in place over the bolts. To bring it all together use the power of the nut tightening itself on the bolt to bring the bolt back through the hole in the lip. After you've gotten the bolts pulled into the lip take off the nuts. Now apply one drop of threadlocker to each one and re-tighten, this time torque them down.

    There is a lot of controversy about the torque specs for style 5s. If you search it there are many different answers you'll get. I don't know what is "correct" according to BBS.

    That being said this is only what I did.

    After tightening all the bolts gently, I started using the torque wrench. If you can imagine a clock, I went from 3 o'clock to 9 o'clock to 12 o'clock to 6 o'clock tighten each bolt to 15 foot pounds. Then go back and torque them all to 20 foot pounds.

    So 15 ft/lbs first, then go to 20 ft/lbs.




    I tried using a hammer to pound the bolts through the lip... God that was so stupid. It was a complete pain in the ass and I ended up nicking the lip with the hammer. Here is prof that it is possible... its just not what I would suggest doing.
    Here is one of the wheels after I had pounded the bolts back in.





    Reassembled.





    -Nick

  7. #7
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    Mounted.

    -Nick

  8. #8
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    great write up

  9. #9
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    Props for this! Glad about how someone has some extra powers to write a how-to while doing some serious prep work. Post some pics with those center caps on, I bet they don't look bad with them. The only thing that I would have done differently is the color of bolts (black), still sick though!

  10. #10
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    awsome write up.. will look forward to this diy when I get some bbs's

  11. #11
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    This is awesome !!! Looks good!

  12. #12

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    looks awesome, and thanks for the DIY. i plan to doing something like this with my set, and you definitely answered alot of my questions.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timppa View Post
    Props for this! Glad about how someone has some extra powers to write a how-to while doing some serious prep work. Post some pics with those center caps on, I bet they don't look bad with them. The only thing that I would have done differently is the color of bolts (black), still sick though!

    Thanks,
    I would if I could, but I already sold them.
    -Nick

  14. #14

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    Great write up for sure!!!
    Shyne~Fitment Done Right---Your #1 socal fender roller

  15. #15
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    i have done about 4 sets now 3style 5s and one set of style 19s...pretty easy one you have done the 1st...cant get a mirror finish yet
    -Jorge-

  16. #16

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    such a good write up! this inspires me to refinish some beat VS-xx....

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by BeemerBuyer View Post
    .... I separated the nuts and bolts into two different jars each full of vinegar. ...
    I did this too (well the nuts), which totally destroyed them.

    *Click Sigpic For Journal*

  18. #18

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    Great write-up! I guess I got really lucky with mine being in such good shape, most I've seen look like yours before you started.

  19. #19

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    I love it!!!

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by MParallel View Post
    I did this too (well the nuts), which totally destroyed them.
    Can you describe what happened to them?
    -Nick

  21. #21

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    im in this process right now...but im not painting...good stuff mang

  22. #22

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    Nice work, same process we did, all takes patience.

    Matt wanted the polished look tho...





  23. #23

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    Wow! this is cool. What I did with my car is that I change the color from black to marble green and black. It looks great and a lot of people turn their eyes onto to my car. I changed the rim from silver to white to because the color of the car is already black so the white rim is really hyped.

  24. #24

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    ^ that looks dangerous

  25. #25

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    came out real good!

    JDL-racing.com|RIZQ Built.
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